Fly Line

General Forum for Fly Fishing

Moderator: Bob Fisher

Post Reply
User avatar
Leith Larham
Forum MODERATOR PHGFC Port Hedland
Posts: 210
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:47 am
Location: Port Hedland

Fly Line

Post by Leith Larham » Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:30 am

I have just changed a number of fly lines over from Scientific Anglers to the Royal Wulff fly lines. I have found that i am achieving slightly longer casts, however the effort in the cast is considerably less to achieve the same distance. I have noticed that the line diameter is smaller than the SA line in the corresponding line weight, which would create less wind resistance when casting.

http://www.royalwulff.com/saltwater_lin ... #saltwater

I would like to hear of any other fly fishers that may have used the Royal Wolff fly lines, or alternatively which fly lines they prefer.

Cheers Leith
Quality not Quantity!

User avatar
Islander
Master Angler Ranking
Posts: 221
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:20 am
Location: Indian Ocean - Pilbara

SA Striper Tapers

Post by Islander » Tue Jan 29, 2008 2:38 am

I've used mainly Scientific Anglers Striper tapers for saltwater stuff.

All lines seem to harden with salt and sunlight & heat over a period of time making them not shoot as easily thru the runners.

I personally am too lazy to pull a flyline off a reel and run it thru soapy water to clean it then apply dressing etc to make it shoot further.

I guess I am lucky to give the reel a rinse in freshwater after some useages - so with salt encrusted lines that are a bit rough and sticky in the guides - i just cast a little harder and double haul a little harder to overcome the restriction..

Thats entirely the wrong thing to say or do - but in reality it's what i do - but I agree nothing casts as nice as a new line outta the box once you stretch the coils outta it and get it warmed up with enough casts to make it supple.

For me that would only ever occur on the first couple outtings after that they would end up like all the others......crud coated. :oops: :lol:

I did use one of their triangle tapers once and it was really nice for accurate presentations - it just turns over beautifully, but wind seemed to affect it a bit more and for some reason, when I fly fish in salt it always seems to blow 10 gales.

I once had a industrial chemist from the USA send me a couple lines to try, that he had invented from some new miracle goop (trying desperately to remember the brand name - still in production but few know if them).

They were dare I say it better than SA Striper & Bonefish tapers with which i was familiar...they were true slick lines - they went slippery as a butchers dick when they got wet..

I'll try and remember the guys name and the name of his lines...the ones he sent me were manufacturing seconds - but they were probably the best i ever used...

Its crap getting old you forget stuff....like peoples and products names...

The guy made a material for trolling lure skirts that was so tough Spanish macks couldn't bite thru it - even scissors wouldn't cut it..
shimmer skin it was called...very hard to get the strips on the skirt material with anything but a scalpel....and you needed one scalpel blade for every cut...

I used to use it for tying shrimp flies carapace, coz it would last and last on toothy critters.

It'll come to me - the name that is...

Leave it with me (Having a seniors moment).

Cheers
Flywest Fishing Charters
http://www.flywest.com.au

User avatar
Leith Larham
Forum MODERATOR PHGFC Port Hedland
Posts: 210
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:47 am
Location: Port Hedland

Post by Leith Larham » Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:58 pm

Thanks Islander,

thats interesting that your using the Scientific Anglers Striper tapers, i know a couple of people using these and they are very happy with this line. They like its ability to be utilised in a number of different saltwater situations.

Cheers Leith
Quality not Quantity!

User avatar
Islander
Master Angler Ranking
Posts: 221
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:20 am
Location: Indian Ocean - Pilbara

I think

Post by Islander » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:09 pm

I think they are good out of a boat - not so good for wading - you see the whole line sinks which means you can't strip the line into the water when wading and still shoot the running line well. You'd need to wear a stripping basket which I detest.

I think one of the sink tip, floating running line bonefish tapers would probably be a better pick if your a shore based and flats wading fly fisher.

I'd sooner be drifting over a flat in a flats boat personally - the idea of NOT being able to run away from a shark or crock or sea snake or whatever, in shallow water while wading don't impress me much - you only have to see your first tiger up close n personal when wading to get the idea that flats boats were invented for a reason!

Image
Pretend I'm a tree growing in the water, pretend I'm a tree growing in the water - maybe he won't notice me...yeah right!
:roll:

For this reason a sinking line and a flats boat are a far better combination than flats wade fishing IMHO.

Cheers
Flywest Fishing Charters
http://www.flywest.com.au

User avatar
Leith Larham
Forum MODERATOR PHGFC Port Hedland
Posts: 210
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:47 am
Location: Port Hedland

Post by Leith Larham » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:21 am

Hi Islander,

is that a pic from West Lewis Island?

if that were me, i would be saying "Here kitty kitty" and try and get a fly into its gob.

Cheers Leith
Quality not Quantity!

User avatar
Islander
Master Angler Ranking
Posts: 221
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:20 am
Location: Indian Ocean - Pilbara

Nope

Post by Islander » Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:15 am

is that a pic from West Lewis Island?
No thats the sand flats around Faurie Island in Shark Bays Eastern Gulf... one of the biggest flats systems in the world anywhere and at some times of the year home to bonefish.

Not that I've caught one there yet and I've tried a few times now.

I haven't given up in my quest. Even the ones at Exmouth (Ningaloo) managed to elude me! :roll:

I'm jinxed i tell ya when it comes to catching Bones on fly in WA! :(

One a these days I'll crack the secret - if I keep at it long enough maybe.

Cheers
Flywest Fishing Charters
http://www.flywest.com.au

Bob Fisher
Administrator
Posts: 1141
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 1:31 am
Location: WorldWide
Contact:

Tiger Shark while bonefishing on the Sand Flats!

Post by Bob Fisher » Fri Feb 01, 2008 2:57 pm

Great shot!

I want to know who took the pic. Were they standing in the water too or in a boat? They look closer to the shark than you...

Ever caught anything or seen any fish on those flats?
Capt. Aussie Bob Fisher
SportfishWorld, LLC.

User avatar
Islander
Master Angler Ranking
Posts: 221
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:20 am
Location: Indian Ocean - Pilbara

Eldest Son

Post by Islander » Sun Feb 03, 2008 6:40 am

My Eldest Son Kelvin took the pic - he was standing on a sand spit.
It's been doctored, if you zoomed it right in close you'd see a mate of mine has stuffed a magazine entitled "Fly Fishing For Dummies" in my pocket, as a joke! :lol: :lol:

Image

These are the flats I'm talking about from space.

Image

Thats from the air.

Yeah I've caught various species here - mostly giant herring, while chasing bonefish. Morsie and I saw Bones here one day - but they were gone the next. Those flats heat and cool very quickly with a change in wind to the south and the Bones only come up out of the deep warmer water onto the flats when they are warm.

As soon as you get a southerly breeze the flats drop 10 degrees in temp overnight and the bones go deep off them.

You need to be there Jan Feb & March - which is at it's windiest to get them up on the flats!

I've had several trips now and never scored a bone but seen one over 10 pounds up close.

When the Bones are there, they follow the big shovel nosed sharks around after the bottom of tide turns. The shovel nose all sleep on the bottom until rising tide, then they feed into the current once it start to rise. The Bones follow the big shovel nosed sharks along maybe 20 feet behind picking up any food dislodged by their pectoral fins as they swim along!

They are real hard to see in the water you have to look for their shadow on the bottom.

If someone spent the time and effort they could get good big bones at Shark Bay. Guys have caught them there fishing deep with bait before today!

Cheers
Flywest Fishing Charters
http://www.flywest.com.au

Bob Fisher
Administrator
Posts: 1141
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 1:31 am
Location: WorldWide
Contact:

Spotting Bonefish

Post by Bob Fisher » Mon Feb 04, 2008 12:40 am

RE: Spotting Bonefish...

My one and only time in the Bahamas on North Andros Island: It only took me a couple of hours to figure out what my guide was doing and then I was spotting them too... Solitary fish: Sometimes their shadow, sometimes their dorsal fin and/or tail fins...

Then there were the big schools that threw a big shadow and rippled the surface as they travelled through the shallow water - that wasn't too hard...

We saw them EVERYDAY ... but they were very skittish and easily spooked when the wind came up...

My guide carried a long pole with him as we walked the flats - he told me it was to ward off sharks

He always got anxious if we had travelled too far from the boat on an incoming tide... he would say "C'mon Bob we gotta go man, dem sharks will be coming up out of da channel and onto da flats soon... "

I saw some small ones but none like that one in your photo

p.s. I never noticed the book before... it's obvious now ...
Capt. Aussie Bob Fisher
SportfishWorld, LLC.

Post Reply

Return to “FLY FISHING”